7th Heaven marijuana scene with Inception music

(Source: st0ner-c0mics, via ruinedchildhood)

77,931 notes
exploringthenetherlands:

Amsterdam Life
buttart:

animals-riding-animals:

wombat riding turtle

the animal kingdom is a strange and beautiful place
Louisa May Alcott wrote Little Women for the money. And it made her miserable.

As a young writer, Alcott concentrated on lurid pulp stories of revenge, murder, and adultery–“blood and thunder” literature, as she called it–and enjoyed writing very much. She was in her mid 30s when an editor suggested she try writing a book for girls. Alcott wasn’t very interested, but her father was a complete moron with money and had left the family in terrible financial trouble. Alcott wrote Little Women in hopes of some decent sales and a little breathing room and got way more than she asked for. The money in sequels was too good to turn down (and her father didn’t get any smarter with a dime), but Alcott hated writing what she called “moral pap for the young” and longed to return to the smut and violence of her early endeavors. Ten Things You Didn’t Know About Books and Authors You Had to Read in High School (via bookriot)

(via booksandghosts)

4,205 notes

rhapsodybrohemian:

houseofdawn:

Drunk in Love (The Weeknd Remix) (x)

Anything he touches turns instantly into sex.

(via black--lamb)

240,833 Plays / 20,409 notes
jesuisperdu:

tomer aluf
High-intensity noise that exceeds 95 decibels disrupts performance on complex tasks but improves it on simple, boring tasks — noise tends to raise arousal level, which can be useful when trying to stay alert during mindless and monotonous work, but can agitate you out of creative flow when immersed in the kind of work that requires deliberate, reflective thought… These effects, of course, are relative to one’s psychological constitution… Writers more afflicted with anxiety tend to be more disconcerted by noisy environments. Proust and Carlyle appear to have been among those writers — the former wrote in a cork-lined room to eliminate obtrusive sounds and the latter in a noiseproof chamber to ensure absolute silence — whereas Allen Ginsberg was known for being able to write anywhere, from trains to planes to parks. The psychology of how daily routine and work environment affect writing and creative flow (via explore-blog)
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